Substance Abuse Destroys Eye Health

It has long been agreed upon that substance abuse is detrimental to all the body’s systems. Overuse of drugs, alcohol or even food can lead to health conditions and toxicity within the body. We have all heard the statistics on liver damaged caused by alcohol consumption and heart failure caused by a drug overdose, but seldom do we consider the effects of substance abuse on the optical organ: the eye. Eye health depends on nutrients, vitamins and medicinal substances that we ingest, so it is only logical that ingesting toxins will lead to poor eye health. Recent studies have supported this opinion.
It has been found that many prescription medications can lead to deteriorated eye health with abuse. An array of pharmaceutical pills has been connected to eye diseases such as uveal tract disease, glaucoma, cataracts, retinal abnormalities and optic nerve diseases. These health detriments can be caused by regular prescription medications when not used as prescribed. Prescription medication abuse is a phenomenon that is rapidly on the rise in North America, with a plethera of side effects and health consequences that continue to be discovered daily.
Alcohol is also a known eye irritant. Bloodshot, twitching eyes are commonly observed in people who have consumed too much alcohol, but the substance has also been found to cause cataract development, short term double vision and ocular rosacea when used too heavily. There are certain instances where a person who has consumed an extremely strong alcohol, such as moonshine, has lost their vision completely. Studies are also beginning to emerge that indicate the chemical MSG can cause vision problems in some people.
We are heavily dependent on sight as a species, and protecting our health should be prioritized. Addiction and substance abuse are a widespread phenomenon in our culture, but medical professionals are actively trying to call awareness to the health problems it can create. For better eye and bodily health, quit substance abuse and return to a diet of nutirtional and medicinal substances.